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April 25, 2014

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First Mediaworks


6/26/00 The Fable Of Ray Dio's Bad Image
Long ago, Raymond Dio was the most popular kid in town. Everyone wanted to play with him because he was so much fun to be around. Ray entertained everyone. He became so popular that people began to pay money to have him mention their names during the times he would entertain. He was the happiest kid around until a new bully moved to town.
This new bully saw how popular Ray was, so he tried to entertain people with new, shiny objects and pictures. It wasn’t long before this bully, Tommy "T" Vee, had taken away all of Ray’s friends. Ray was sad. He tried and tried to get his friends back, but they liked "T" Vee better. Soon, all those people — who paid Ray to mention their names — stopped paying.
After years of loneliness, Ray came up with a new idea. He befriended a new kid named Rocky Roll, and together they became so popular that all the kids flocked to them. Ray was happy once again. But, the people who paid to be mentioned while they entertained still gave most of their mention money to "T" Vee. Ray tried anything he could to get people to spend money with him. He began dressing flashier and slicking back his hair. He started fibbing to people and then fibbing a little more. Over the course of the next many years, Ray's reputation was "someone who would do anything to get money, even if it wasn’t helpful." Ray just kept trying more and more stupid tricks, but his image just got worse.
One day, Ray met a guy from Madison Avenue in New York. The guy suggested a 10-year plan to change Ray’s image. They started the process by offering a giant reward, bigger than any reward in the land, just to get everyone’s attention. Then they threw a big party with tuxedos and fancy bands. Everyone came, but they were skeptical that Ray had not changed. But Ray persisted and kept throwing this party every year. Slowly, all these people started to like Ray again, and his image began to change.
One day, however, the big supporters helping Ray pay for his big party decided they didn’t need Ray’s help anymore, because he had helped change their image, too. They cut costs of the big party, taking it from a big hall to a small one. They cut out the entertainment, went cheap on the food and made their presentation look small, destroying many years of good will in one night.
The following year, Ray and his friends tried something new — and it worked. They held a luncheon. Though it was not the big event of the past, they made it work and rebuilt some of the image they had thrown away. Ray Dio’s image, in the eyes of his friends, was no longer tarnished forever.
The moral of the story? If you’re the Radio Mercury Awards and you try to create a positive image for Radio, do things well, or don’t do them at all. They had set a high expectation for Radio with years of wonderful events, changing Radio’s image. Without big $ support by the big Radio groups, lowered standards meant an embarrassing event. This year, the Mercury Awards, a streamlined, polished luncheon, recovered Radio’s image. Nice job, guys. You came through like the pros you are.


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