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The Seller’s Spots Dodge



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(11/28/2013 12:00:51 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Ron,
The aromas from the culinary delights drifting in from the kitchen on this Thanksgiving morning are distracting me.
I have a thought or two for your consideration tomorrow. In the meantime, "creative" is an accident and an opinion. If it wasn't, 100% of the people would like Lady Gaga.

- Merv
(11/28/2013 11:22:01 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Merv sez, "Salespeople need to shepherd their sales carefully, every step of the way."

Nobody with a wack o' sense would disagree with that, Merv.

Our whole contention here is that the spots aren't near good enough to get us above that debilitating 5% of available-advertising ceiling.

Further, being a radio-slut myself, I am not going to arbitrarily reject client-driven copy. But, given the much more effective forms of broadcast advertising that are available and that could be exploited, it is a position that will get the sale, but it won't get the required "sales" - at least not to the degree we need to be able to generate in order to take this project (radio) to the next level of expertise.

A better explanation in the next piece, "The Radio Brain".

- Ronald T. Robinson
(11/28/2013 10:52:09 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Jeff,

You should know better. Bill Mann, whom you lionized on this blog a few weeks ago, had the training and background to politely disagree with you.
Salespeople need to shepherd their sales carefully, every step of the way.
It shows when you don't.

- Merv
(11/28/2013 7:33:40 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
What Jeff sez is, indeed, the case. I wouldn't call it the pachyderm in the place - more like the frothing, rabid pitbull.

Perhaps, given enough evidence, management may begin to realize the magnificent opportunities to be more appealing to audiences and effective for advertisers that are being missed.

Over the last 20 years and more, the priorities have been about suppressing talent in all areas of programming.

This is the antithesis of providing advanced training for the same people who are being chucked overboard or slapped into irons below decks.

- Ronald T. Robinson
(11/28/2013 1:41:45 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Ronald,

Your obviously a friendly, knowledgable and helpful talent coach who teaches great copywriting and much much more. It appears sellers could come to you for all their copywriting needs.

I jest. I agree with you completely. There are two issues at play in my experience. First is a lack of training on how to write compelling ads, and second a lack of time given to create. The pressures of hitting the number seem to make quantity the favorite over quality.

Thanks

- Jeff Schmidt
(11/27/2013 10:08:08 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
While a lot of managers and salespeople who are involved in the spot-writing process would be quick to defend their positions, there may also be a significant number of managers who must reluctantly agree with my own and the comments of "naro" - below.

The choke-point lies at the intersection where awareness of a critical state meets not knowing what to do next.

- Ronald T. Robinson
(11/27/2013 9:51:47 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
The advertising in the NYC talk stations is so low class, demeaning, and geared to utter losers and mentally defectives that it must turn off potential intelligent listeners. It upsets me that the station thinks so little of me when it inundates me with seedy, untruthful, and thieving ads. I think that station owners need to realize that the level and quality of the advertising reflects on their stations, and they better be more selective in the quality and quantity.
- naro


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