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(AUDIO) Is The FM Translator AM's Savior?



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(4/12/2013 10:07:20 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
the fcc should allow other forms of modulation besides amplitude modulation in the current AM radio band. Also they should allow use single side band at 95 percent of the rated carrier. For example on WABC the carrier at their rated power 50k & the side band at 45k. Also allow Digital Radio Mondiale in the other us used side band also at 95 percent or the carrier. Finally allow Frequency Modulation at the AM radio frequency. They should use the narrow band FM like police use on 2way radio
- Calvin
(4/12/2013 5:53:25 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
We're not going to save AM broadcasting with FM translators. While making some AM operations commercially viable again, that option does nothing to fix AM's reception problems. Power increases, synchronous transmission sites, changes in antenna efficiency requirements, all of these more directly address the problem of overcoming interference. There are AM's with very high quality and popular content in many markets, but without being heard, the prognosis is not good for them.
- Jaime Arbona
(4/12/2013 1:22:54 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Paul, it isn't just 35 year olds or younger who haven't listened to AM for a long time. My wife who is near retirement age and who I first met in at a college AM radio station has never tuned into the AM programming of a local FM station she listens to every morning. She's a dial cruiser, but only on FM! Many older folks have long abandoned scratchy, shrill, sticky narrow band AM as have many broadcasters. I added IBOC to an AM music holdout. The audio quality was quite stunning on an HD receiver. But then management decided to abandon the format for talk. The low bit-rate IBOC codec sounds awful with voice programming as there isn't enough overall sound to hide the artifacts. You're not going to sell many HD radios with that sort of programming! So, that leaves FM translators, when available, as the only way to improve AM.
- Ira Wilner
(4/12/2013 12:21:20 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
So funny... AM IS ALREADY DEAD. It's time to accept it and decide how to deal with it. The FCC should have never allowed the proliferation of low power community FM's across the nation. This unused bandwidth should have been used as a replacement for AM, but that window has now closed.
- Chuck
(4/12/2013 10:50:59 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
I believe AM Translators are something that will help AM for all the reasons stated. Two big problems that still face AM outside of the IPod and Hairdryer argument is programming and the ability to reach listeners. Many AM stations are poorly programmed, sound terrible, and are day-timers with limited hours. People under 35 don't understand going off the air anymore, AM or FM. Simple, "can they get you?", and "do they like what they hear?".
- David Barr
(4/12/2013 10:44:20 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Having any one of our 6 am's on an fm translator would be great, but religious and non commercial broadcasters have always had an advantage in radio frequencies. Daisy chaining hundreds of fm translators to make one mega fm ! No way a regular broadcaster has a chance until those rules are changed.
- Greg Steckline
(4/12/2013 10:20:17 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Bud's point that having an FM presence helps with ADVERTISER acceptance is well taken, but the reason we're having this conversation is that the AM band is in trouble. Many listeners under age 35 haven't even LISTENED to an AM station for years. I'm an owner with ONE AM/FM translator combo and frankly without the FM signal we'd be out of business. CBS put WFAN (a 50kw AM powerhouse) on an FM stick because they set the same train coming.
- Paul Wilson


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