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Are You Trying to Kill Off AM Radio?



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(11/20/2012 12:39:17 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
As a former small AM group operator, I considered myself to be one of the last hold-outs for AM radio. That went away when i went to work for a stand alne FM 13 months ago...and really got into the minds of the people spending money on media today. AM, in their minds, does not exist. They don't listen, and they know no one who does. Aside from 50,000 watters that carry strong local news or have the Rush block, there are too many radio stations providing too few options for audience. it's time to re-think and overhaul AM by at least considering one or more of the following: 1) stop the simulcasting..Walt's correct; 2) require local origination, and failingbthat, surrender the license; 3)move signal challenged AM stations to FM translators, in exchange for taking their facility dark. This would clean up the spectrum and allow for technological innovation; 4)with a cleaner spectrum, allow stations higher levels of power to completely cover daytime and nighttime interference; 5) renegotiate the international treaties for interference; 6) and this is a big one..re-regulate the standards for RECEIVERS, which now are sub-standard.
- KEVIN FENNESSY
(11/20/2012 11:49:39 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
i'VE BEEN THE PROGRAM DIR. AND MORNING MAN FOR WDIA IN MEMPHIS SINCE 1983....I KNOW FOR A FACT AM IS NOT DEAD AND WHEN ITS DONE RIGHT AM CAN BE MORE EXCITING TO LISTEN TO THAN FM ESPECIALLY FOR THE 40 PLUS DEMO...I SEE A REBIRTH OF THE AM DIAL AND THERE'S MORE GREAT TALENT AVAILABLE FOR THE AM BAND THAN FM THESE DAYS..THESE GREAT JOCKS CAN'T WAIT TO GET BACK ON THE AIR...
- BOBBY OJAY
(11/20/2012 11:39:48 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
iBiquity and the larger broadcasters, who are investors, are trying to force the smaller AM broadcasters to lease their FM-HD channels, because they have failed ROI. Spill digital hash all over the AM band until it is unlistenable.
- Bruce Carter
(11/20/2012 11:07:24 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
As a former suburban station manager and former major market sales rep turned agency owner, I've said it in guest blog articles and I'll say it again: stations are run by private companies but licenses are a public trust. Big consolidated group ownership's priority is to pay for the debt service on their acquisitions--not to serve the local communities. I managed a stand-alone AM daytimer in the shadow of a top 10 market. We got on the phone, called local residents and asked them what they wanted on their local station--and we gave them just that. You want to keep AM alive? Keep it live and local. People depend on you for the news, traffic and weather in THEIR community. One station I worked for had its highest listenership all year when we covered local elections. It's not rocket science...but it is radio science.
- Barry Cohen
(11/20/2012 11:00:59 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
AM-HD simply does not work, but it works well at slamming adjacent-stations with digital hash. There are no other reasons for the larger radio groups to run AM-HD. AM radio was fine until IBOC came on the scene. Around D.C., I easily listen to WTOP and WMAL, to name a few - they are as clear as any FM station. Someone(s) is trying to convince us all that AM is dead and/or needs a revamping. Take IBOC off AM, and everything goes back to being just fine.
- Spillage
(11/20/2012 10:52:37 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
all the FM translators have been taken by religions, and foreign language stations and simply are not available to AM stations. any translator priced over $25,000 is overpriced. (excluding large mkts). what what about all the translators that are silent? what what about the ratio of translators in the non-com band versus the commercial band. where is the FCC on this?
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(11/20/2012 10:33:20 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
There are creative ways to combine AM&FM to overcome technical issues and cross promote one's newstalk franchise. The majority of those wanting news from radio listen in the morning. We simulcast morning drive on FM so we can overcome the nulls and low power prior to sunrise. We run the same program but with separate stopsets and air CBS on AM and Fox News on FM. After morning drive each station has a different talk lineup. The AM is still the number two biller in a 5 station cluster. We also have a News-Talk-Sports franchise that allows us to get around conflicts when we have two teams playing at the same time on the AM. We just give our listeners a heads up on air and on our Facebook page letting them know which game will be on AM and which one will be on FM. Uisng the franchise for a limited simulcast helps us with our AM and also helps us use our FM to bring more talk shows to our market and exposes our younger FM listeners to AM if they want to hear the Tigers.
- Dave Maurer


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