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Saving The AM Band is a Very Hot Topic



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(9/28/2012 10:13:25 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
AM needs traction. There are many things, outside of FM translators or an extension of the band, which will take ten years to facilitate. AM synchonous carriers, using same equipment that $99 GPS units use, will make nighttime have less interference and better coverage locally. Richard Arsenault the consulting engineer proposed pushing Pre-Sunrise back to 5am. The power increases you folks are mentioning will take cooperation from Mexico and Canada, and won't happen overnight. Getting rid of the HD mask, closest to the analog audio on AM will help them, too! And open up your audio bandwidth, and let us hear what your transmitter can do. 5 KHz or 6 KHz was a failed effort, on those group owners with IBOC. We run AM radio stations, NOT police radios! This commissioner is a 'breath of fresh air', and I hope we'll all drop him a note of encouragement. He needs to hear our ideas, all of them, and he said as much at Dallas, last week.
- Mark Heller
(9/28/2012 10:04:12 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Additionally, the FCC should authorize all translators at the maximum of 250W only! Anything less is worthless and does not offer enuf building penetration to make the facility worthwhile. Secondly, the FCC should allow a maximum of 10% seperate programming on translators. IE: if you have play-by-play sports on your station(s) - you could air the ballgame on your AM and continue your regularly scheduled programming on your translator - thus maximizing audience and revenue.
- Iconoclast
(9/28/2012 10:01:42 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
FM translators will do little to change AM. The long term solution is to migrate the AM band to TV channel 5 and 6. In the short term, give all AM stations a 50% power increase to improve penetration. As power grids have become more overloaded and cities of every size have become more concentrated, the noise level challenging AM signals has become worse. We could trade the extra "beef" for a 10% reduction in modulation and it won't damage the band and we will all sound better.
- Fred Lundgren
(9/28/2012 9:08:59 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
There was a time when I worked for a San Diego programmer and an L.A. consultant - simultaneously. They both insisted that "AM, FM or shortwave... it's always about The Programming." (I couldn't argue as we were winning on one AM and I went on to dominate at another. This, at a time when AM had already been declared dead, particularly as a music source.)
- Ronald T. Robinson


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