Current Issue:



September 8:
The Radio Show Issue
Emmis CEO Jeff Smulyan




Click here to subscribe to Radio Ink.






Radio Ink Writers




















User Feedback

WMMT Will go Off The Air Without CPB Funding.



Add a Comment

(3/11/2011 10:49:06 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
WMMT is the only radio station I listen to - and I listen to it in Brooklyn, NY. Living in Pikeville, Kentucky one summer, I was deeply impressed with the knowledge of the DJs and the really outstanding documentary programming WMMT produced. Losing just this one station would be a serious blow to American culture. Losing all the many other community stations like it would be create a terrible silence across this country.
- Devon Kearney
(3/11/2011 5:02:36 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
You made your bed now you will have to lie in it. Your anti-coal stand has hit you in your pocketbook. Yes some people will have to be layed off if WMMT goes off the air. How many miners have lost their jobs because of the anti coal people.
- John Cooper
(3/11/2011 3:16:04 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Hello from WMPG, Community Radio in Portland, Maine. We get more than a quarter of our funding annually from CPB, and we do not air any NPR programming at all...instead hundreds of volunteers produce vital, diverse, local radio which is by, for, and about our community. Loss of CPB funding would cripple us; so add WMPG to the list of who would REALLY feel the hit if the CPB is eliminated...

Elizabeth Bunker
Program Director, WMPG

- Elizabeth Bunker
(3/11/2011 2:59:47 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
With all federal discretionary programs, it is always the poorest and most rural areas and citizens who take the brunt of the punch from cheap shot politicians. And that is because, since they are mostly millionaires, including 60% of the newly elected tea baggers, they have no way to know what they are talking about. That is compounded by the fact they they despise education as elitist and so never made the effort to educate themselves. It's easier to just listen to the extremists.
- Dwight Bobson
(3/11/2011 2:54:09 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
We too, will not be an NPR affiliate, but will be a Community station providing local programming to a very rural area in "tornado alley's" reddest state, Oklahoma. Our area has many local problems and issues that media need to discuss in a civil manner, but are not. The local NPR station has only 6% local programming, most of which is music. Many other stations carry "hate talk" programming or religious proselytizing. In order to get on the air, we must depend on a PTFP grant. In spite of our dedicated volunteers, remaining on air may not be possible in our rather poor area. Utilities and leasing tower space are just part of the expenses of running even a small radio station.
Surely it is a legitimate Government role to help local communities enhance their access to information, especially in an area where the average median household income is $26,250. Unless we have supplemental funding, Our efforts of the last 4 years to provide civil dialogue about local issues will be for naught.

Sincerely,
Mary Francis, President
KVOY Community Radio and VoicesofOK.org

- Mary Francis
(3/11/2011 1:56:04 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
I too am confused by all the talk about de-funding CPB, NPR, and PBS. We are in the process of building a non-commercial-educational radio station for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe in Northern Minnesota. The station will serve the Leech Lake Reservation with cultural programming for Native Americans. We will not carry any NPR programs. I've heard if federal funding is cut it will amount to about 4% of NPR's budget...no big deal right? For a local community radio station this will amount to 25% or more of our budget. It could also impact our ability to receive Native Amercian programming via CPB. It is the little guys who need funding the most that will be hurt... not the NPR's of the world. The big loosers are the people of communities that are served by these community stations.
- Brad Walhof
(3/11/2011 12:11:03 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Marcie Crim's perspective is that of someone who is in the thick of this, at a grass-roots level.
Her voice, and others, are those we need to hear.
They have to take a much closer look at this issue than Rhoads or Schiller.

Especially if Rhoads honestly thinks "that $430 million that goes to public radio and TV would go a long way to reduce the federal budget."
Long way? Has he SEEN the latest budget?

Or if Schiller feels that federal funding of NPR equals some sort of limiting government "influence".

The view from the top, or from the outside, is always foggy, regardless of whatever "big picure" perspective there may be. The real effects are felt by those at the stations and their listeners.

- Tom Phillips


Add a Comment

 
Advertisements

Advertisements