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How Pandora Plans to Bury Radio. See Their detailed Plan.



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(2/14/2011 6:46:02 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
David--Yes, you did hear this before; however, satellite radio started as a paid subscription on a (then) brand-new hardware platform with no pre-existing users.

Internet radio is free, 95%-plus of everyone that matters is already using the platform (a computer or smartphone), and one doesn't have to be "visionary" to connect the dots regarding economy of advertising scale. See the difference?


- Will Baumann
(2/14/2011 6:45:56 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
David--Yes, you did hear this before; however, satellite radio started as a paid subscription on a (then) brand-new hardware platform with no pre-existing users.

Internet radio is free, 95%-plus of everyone that matters is already using the platform (a computer or smartphone), and one doesn't have to be "visionary" to connect the dots regarding economy of advertising scale. See the difference?


- Will Baumann
(2/14/2011 6:25:25 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Didn't we hear the same thing about satellite radio?
- David
(2/14/2011 5:08:06 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
As the demographics for “decision makers” (the people who buy ads) change, current-form broadcast radio’s viability will diminish. If you have ANY doubt, spend a weekend with some 25-35 year old, smartphone carrying professionals and you’ll get the drift. The base-plus commission radio reps are going to have a really tough time with this crowd. Keep in mind that radio runs on ads—not programming (unless it’s something like NPR—or you have the luxury of being able to give it away for free). As we all know, on-air talent produces zilch unless an organization can create a revenue stream from it.

“Free” in-dash digital radio with all the essential features of broadcast radio will have a HUGE impact on drive-time ad margins and if you own a stick or two, you’re going to feel the pinch. National advertising will move to Pandora-like services. Mom and pops will stay with sticks (i.e. pay for ads) longer, but one has to wonder how viable those businesses will be if they fail to adapt to a more modern business model as smartphone carrying customers upload bar codes while walking the aisles to check for the best deals.

Times change; institutions and ideas that fail to adapt don’t survive. Witness the Pony Express, telegraph, newspapers, land lines, Borders, and Yellow Pages. Just because WE love broadcast radio does not mean it will linger in its present form and the math model for keeping it viable just isn’t there. You may want to think broadcast radio is going to be different from other obsolete technology, but it’s not. Well—enough from me; I’m off to the foundry to get a new hilt for my bronze sword.

- Will Baumann
(2/14/2011 3:15:18 PM)   Flag as inappropriate content
When I want to know the artist on a song played by Pandora, I have to scan my smartphone; not wise when I'm walking much less while driving. Even then I may only know the album or cut name but see nothing about the artist or musicians (much less the recording date, etc). While I'm a Pandora listener, I still tune into my favorites radio stations to hear on-air talent giving me information that increases my enjoyment and understanding of the music. Not to mention traffic and weather conditions. Pandora's great but it won't replace radio. There's a reason we refer to on-air people as 'talent'.
- Jaime Arbona
(2/14/2011 11:03:41 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Radio has a lot of people listening to the same content at the same time and this is bad? No medium can mobilize the community...and consumers...like radio. You need no further proof than the million dollars-plus we raise in 16 hours for our local Childrens hospital each year. Can Pandora do that? Not now. Not ever.
- Jim
(2/14/2011 10:57:47 AM)   Flag as inappropriate content
Pandora to kill radio? Seems like I've heard it before. Satellite Radio, the internet, Ipods/Ipads...etc. etc.

We AM radio folks have been there done that. People quit listening to music on AM radio 35 years ago.

It took awhile, but AM radio responded with different content.

The bottom line is this, if you serve your listeners with compelling content, you can compete. If you don't, you won't survive. It doesn't matter if you're a small market AM or a 10 station cluster, or Pandora, Sirius/XM.


- Sean

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