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How Can Radio Keep At-Work Listeners?

9-20-13

At-Work Listening
In the "What's Working at Work" study, presented today at the Radio Show in Orlando, Edison Research found that less than half of those who listen to audio at work are listening to broadcast radio, while one-third listen to Internet radio. Commercials are a big issue for those who stay away from broadcast radio, but Edison says information and a sense of companionship are a strength broadcasters can emphasize more to regain their edge.

Edison Research President Larry Rosin notes, "Since Edison conducted the first major study of at-work listening 16 years ago, the workplace has been completely transformed in every conceivable way. When we did our previous study of at-work radio listening in 1997, we didn’t even ask about listening to radio online. Now, AM/FM radio is in a much more competitive at-work media environment. Some of the new options that consumers have for audio have completely changed the notion of what constitutes an acceptable number of commercials. I hope this study leads to more urgent consideration of how broadcasters can keep revenues up while simultaneously reducing commercial time in each hour."

In 1997, 65 percent of workers said they listened to AM/FM radio at work; now, that's only 49 percent, with nearly a quarter saying the reason is that there are too many commercials. Of the one-third of audio-using workers who listen to Internet radio, a full two-thirds say Internet radio plays fewer commercials, and 46 percent say it plays "a lot less" commercials.

Online radio has increased the time spent with audio, as 22 percent of Internet radio users says it's new listening, while 28 percent say it's replacing time spent with their own music collection. The rest of those who listen to Internet-only radio at work say it mostly replaces time they'd have spent with AM/FM radio.

In other findings, Edison found that most who listen to AM/FM do so on a radio, while 41 percent listen over the computer and 35 percent on a smartphone. Seventy-two percent listening to Internet radio at work tune in on a laptop, but 52 percent listen on smartphones.




(9/23/2013 1:00:40 PM)
They didn't include the exact survey verbiage on # of ads being a primary reason for listening less at work but.....
I doubt it.
Radio has as many ads now as it did in the earlier surveys, unfortunately, maybe less.
Anytime a survey puts words in respondant's mouth the survey results are suspect. If there are fewer radios allowed at work, it's probably caused by the animalistic sounds (music?) oozing through the workplace offending customers and the owner.

- Phil
(9/23/2013 10:01:40 AM)
I think that at-work listening stats are a kind of canary in a coal mine for broader radio listening. As a radio LOVER (I was born and bred on radio), I find the level of current spot loads offensive and will search desperately for more music or information when I'm irritated by the succession of ads and promos. It's super irritating at work.

As a former GSM, I understand the land lock radio is in. Goals must be met in an environment characterized by market-driven pricing, alternative competitors (including streaming video via mobile devices and social media)and a free product delivery model is the standard.

I don't know what the answer is or if there really is an answer.

- Larry
(9/23/2013 10:01:40 AM)
I think that at-work listening stats are a kind of canary in a coal mine for broader radio listening. As a radio LOVER (I was born and bred on radio), I find the level of current spot loads offensive and will search desperately for more music or information when I'm irritated by the succession of ads and promos. It's super irritating at work.

As a former GSM, I understand the land lock radio is in. Goals must be met in an environment characterized by market-driven pricing, alternative competitors (including streaming video via mobile devices and social media)and a free product delivery model is the standard.

I don't know what the answer is or if there really is an answer.

- Larry
(9/22/2013 8:45:57 AM)
Any time a diatribe begins with, "In a workplace, PPM world....", the listener can expect that whatever follows will be that which emanates from the south end of a northbound bull.
At-work listeners will tune in to whatever source that is the most appealing and/or the least irritating.
Let's work on that.

- Ronald T. Robinson

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